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Dublin Airport to introduce new Anti-Drone Tech

Dublin Airport to introduce new Anti-Drone Tech

The Head of Dublin and Cork Airports has announced that new anti-drone technology allows drone control and termination.

Dublin airport has been forced to close down six times in the year 2023 because of drones flying into the airspace, resulting in massive flight delays and causing difficulties for thousands of passengers.

During a Tuesday press conference, Kenny Jacobs, CEO of DAA, admitted that the airport has been dealing with drone issues for a few weeks now.





“We welcome the decision taken by the state to give us authority to operate a drone effector piece of technology that allows you to take control of and bring down a drone,” said Mr Jacobs.

Mr Jacobs stressed that using this technology would reduce the likelihood of Dublin airport closures due to drone activity.

Technology is helping minimise disruption risks and reduce their duration. Advanced detection systems enable us to take over a drone's control and send it back or bring it down in a safe manner.

Also Read: A man appeared in court, facing allegations of operating a drone in a “critical area” close to Dublin Airport.

Mr Jacobs emphasized that the new drone protection system is not a surefire solution.





“The drone effector technology is proven technology that does work,” he said.

It is strictly forbidden to fly drones within a five-kilometre radius of Dublin airport or any other airport. This rule has always been in place, and it must be followed at all times.

The drone-deterring tech will be operational within a few weeks, making it one of the fastest installations yet. Mr Jacobs stated that they have placed an order and are confident to be operational within a few weeks.

Other airports have taken three to four months for the task, whereas we plan to complete it within three to four weeks after the Government passes the statutory instrument.

Eddie Wilson, CEO of Ryanair, voiced his dissatisfaction with the amount of chaos drones caused to Irish air travel.

He expressed his discontent with the closure of a major European airport due to drone activity and hoped that there won't be any more such occurrences till the new safety systems become functional.

Maintaining cost-effectiveness is paramount in ensuring this Island's economic recovery & its connective job opportunities, as it is home to the largest airline in Europe.

At a press conference on Tuesday, Mr Wilson and Mr Jacobs commented on Ryanair's Dublin summer 2023 schedule with 14 newly-added destinations such as Venice, Stockholm, Leipzig & Kos.